Free Essay Examples and Topics

Marriage, By Thomas Hardy

Marriage is a topic whose perceived importance is constantly changing with the passage of time, but marriage remains, and has remained, a heated topic of discussion for centuries. Thomas Hardy wrote Jude the Obscure in 1896, and used it to critique marriage, among many other things. The novel...

1 598 words

Passion Versus Moral Duty Illustrated in Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure

Conflict between a character’s intense passions and their moral duties is commonly expressed in literature. Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure undoubtedly uses this theme throughout the novel. Hardy creates two characters who are undeniably in love, however, they are forced to hide their...

632 words

Jude the Obscure: The Relationship Between Point of View and Setting

In part one chapter two of the novel Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy the author depends upon external narration shifting freely to external omniscient narration in order to provide sufficient information about the village in which the main character, Jude, lives. The setting, Marygreen is...

1 815 words

Bird Imagery in Jane Eyre

In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses many types of imagery to provide understanding of the characters and also to express reoccurring themes in the novel. Through bird imagery specifically, we are able to see Jane develop from a small, unhappy child into a mature and satisfied young woman...

2 864 words

Sexism in Jane Eyre

The social system of the Victorian era was one that was heavily influenced by the patriarchal right of men. This social construct favored men while forcing women into submission. Sigmund Freud, in his essay entitled “The Relation of the Poet to Day-Dreaming,” articulated that women...

2 077 words

Independence in Jane Eyre Essay

Jane Eyre, a novel written by Charlotte Bronte, is about a young girl named Jane that struggles to discover her identity. Jane’s a girl who is “unhappy, very unhappy”(23). She grows up with relatives that treat her unfairly because her diseased family was not wealthy...

741 words

Essay on Criticisms of Jane Eyre

The major criticisms of the novel in question to be the melodrama used by the author and the wickedness of character shown in Jane and Mr. Rochester. While most critics admired the style of writing and truth of character portrayal, they did not admire the improbability of circumstances or the...

1 718 words

The Dichotomy of Imagery in 'Jane Eyre'

Upon initially examining Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre, there appears to be a predominance of imagery that the author utilizes to represent both the title character and the various forms of adversity she comes into contact with. The vast majority of this imagery depicts the dichotomy of...

1 580 words

Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe Essay

Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe, a romantic story set in Medieval England; embodies the definition of how a novel’s themes are applied to human life. The representation of Jews in Ivanhoe, through the character Rebecca, outlines the most important themes within the novel such as chivalry...

1 348 words

The Famous Romance Novel of Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott

Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott is one of the most famous historical fiction books in the modern era. This 544 paged book has inspired many teens who are interested to know about the events that took place in England in the twelfth century. Sir Walter Scott wrote this book in 1819 to focus on the...

817 words

Why Are Things Are The Way They Are By Daniel Quinn

Daniel Quinn’s novel Ishmael discusses the aspiration the character Ishmael has toward teaching his student known as the narrator to “save the world”. Ishmael teaches the narrator to understand and form ideas, based on examining the question “why are things are the way they...

1 519 words

Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael - Paradigms of Yesterday Essay

"Come with me if you want to live," was all that Arnold Schwarzenegger said in his movie Terminator 2: Judgement Day, and after reading Daniel Quinn's masterpiece Ishmael, one might well receive the impression Quinn echoes such sentiments. Few books have as much relevancy in this...

1 098 words

Ishmael, By Ishmael And The Narrator

Ishmael is an interesting story that begins when the narrator sees an ad for a teacher. Not only is the ad for a teacher, but one that only seeks students whom have a desire to save the world. When he does finally respond to the ad and meets the teacher in person, he realizes his teacher is in...

1 645 words

Exploring the Theme of Moral Responsibility in Daniel Quinn's Ishmael

We are destroying the earth in order to survive. What is our Moral Responsibility? Daniel Quinn has written a book about how things have come to be the way they are. He looks at the meaning of the world and the fate of humans. Ishmael the main character is a teacher of vast wisdom, as well as...

771 words

Invisible Man Essay: Self-Identity in Invisible Man

In the novel, Invisible Man, the main character carries around a briefcase throughout the entire story. All of the possessions that he carries in that briefcase are mementos from learning experiences. Throughout the novel, the Invisible Man is searching for his identity and later discovers that...

1 130 words

The Narrator As An Invisible Man

The novel opens with the nameless narrator introducing himself to the reader as an invisible man. The Narrator makes it clear that he is not actually invisible but is considered as such because people refuse to see him. The Narrator is speaking from an underground space illuminated by a ridiculous...

1 349 words

Blindness And Invisibility : The Invisible Man

Blindness and invisibility are the two concepts that are discussed regardless of racism and the position one tends to manage between individuality and community. In Ellison’s The Invisible Man , he not only show the oppression of the whites over the blacks as superiors in which makes the...

1 471 words

The Evolution of the Invisible Man in Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

In everyone's life, there are growing experiences. People evolve not only physically as they get older but also ideologically. Perhaps they might become wiser or shrug off the trendy doctrines that may have tried to shape their destiny long ago. Ralph Ellison illustrates this struggle of...

1 367 words

The Struggle For An Invisible Man

Ellison’s Invisible man is about a man who struggles to find his place in a racist society. His character goes on a plummet from being forced to literally fight to get into college, to being kicked out of the college. After that he moved to the city but was not finding a job he could keep...

1 907 words

Themes & Symbols: Inherit The Wind Essay

As probably the best courtroom dramas of the twentieth century, Inherit the Wind is based on the famous, Scopes Monkey Trial. The play was printed virtually thirty years afterward and takes original authority in varying the true-life elements of the court case. The central conflict of the play is...

1 498 words

Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

One of the most controversial plays of its time is hands down, Inherit the Wind. The main debate throughout the play is the debate between science and religion. A bit of a background for those that are naive to the topic in this time period to follow. Small towns such as Hillsboro were very prone...

1 105 words

Controvery of Creation vs. Evolution in Inherit the Wind, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

In Inherit The Wind, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, is about a big trial in a small town, and a controversial Creation versus Evolution debate. There are many characters with flamboyant and powerful personalities. Among them are: Matthew Harrison Brady, and Henry Drummond. Although all of...

810 words

Comparing Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and Our Time

Real writing, soul writing is dangerous; there is an intrinsic, gut-churning element of risk within the process of telling the truth, a risk that yields an adrenaline rush that parallels skydiving and skinny-dipping. The thrill of one's own truth displayed nakedly in little black letters on a...

1 321 words

Essay on Traditions in Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Though considerable effort has been made to classify Harriet Ann Jacobs'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself as another example of the typical slave narrative, these efforts have in large part failed. Narrow adherence to this belief limits real appreciation of the...

3 768 words

A Question of Ethics in 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl'

In the autobiographical work entitled Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, the protagonist, Linda Brent (which is actually a mere pseudonym for author Harriet Jacobs, faces an ethical dilemma that is highly emblematic of one of the core problems of slavery, especially for female slaves...

1 735 words

Women In Slavery in Harriet Jacob's Incidents in the life of a Slave Girl

The notion of slavery, as unpleasant as it is, must nonetheless be examined to understand the hardships that were caused in the lives of enslaved African-Americans. Without a doubt, conditions that the slaves lived under could be easily described as intolerable and inhumane. As painful as the...

949 words

Incidents During The Life Of A Slave Girl

What was life like for slaves prior to the beginning of the Civil War? Use examples from Harriet’s narrative or information you gained from other sources to describe the institution of slavery.  Most slaves went through violent whippings and severe deprivation inflicted on them by their...

2 306 words

Analysis of Murder in Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood

Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood documents the homicide of the Clutter family, the search for the killers, and the trial and execution of the two convicted murderers Perry Smith and Dick Hickock. Capote gives a detailed insight into the lives of the four Clutters prior to their untimely deaths...

739 words

Cold Blood : The Trial Of The Century

Timelines and storytelling are two of the important aspects of any trial which occurs in the American Courts. The story of “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote’s original publication in a four part article in The New Yorker, In Cold Blood was turned into a movie, some would say a...

976 words

Cold Blood By Truman Capote, A Cold Blooded Killer

Without the basic necessities such as water and sunlight, a flower will not bloom into a beautiful, colorful creation, but rather wilt into a brown, unrecognizable mess. Just like a flower needs water and sunlight to thrive, a child requires support from a guardian to prosper in every aspect. A...

1 101 words

In Cold Blood Authorial Intents

On November 15, 1959, the whole nation was shocked by a ghastly murder involving four family members in the discrete farm town of Holcomb, Kansas. It was most shocking because a crime of this magnitude with no motive was rare. This was so discomforting a well known author, by the name of Truman...

1 728 words

Cold Blood : A True Crime Story

Truman Capote was a prolific writer during the 1950s, having written many novels, plays, and short stories. “Truman Capote was one of the most famous and controversial figures in contemporary American literature” (George).One of his most known work is a novel he wrote in 1966 titled...

1 979 words

Displacement, a Theme in Maya Angelou´s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

The feeling of displacement leaves a painful hole in one's heart. Whether a person is a male or female, white or black, lives in the North or South, or young or old, displacement takes a toll on their character and personality. Maya Angelou creates a theme of displacement in her novel I Know...

1 997 words

The Theme of Racism in Maya Angelou’s Novel, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

In this essay I will be talking about how the theme of Racism is developed throughout Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings novel. Angelou on the second page states, “Wouldn’t they be surprised when one day I woke out of my black ugly dream, and my real hair, which was...

1 116 words

Maya Angelou as a Caged Bird

The graduation scene from I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings illustrates how, living in the midst of racism and unequal access to opportunity, Maya Angelou was able to surmount the obstacles that stood in her way of intellectual develop and find "higher ground."  One of the largest...

1 140 words

Book Report on I Know Why The Caged Birds Sing by Maya Angelou

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings is a novel by Maya Angelou, where she writes about her childhood and her experiences while growing up. This non-fiction novel illustrates Maya Angelou’s childhood, being tossed around by her parents, and having to experience different cultures. Maya struggles...

921 words

We All Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

Maya Angelou was a civil rights activist, author, and poet. She wrote many books and poems that conveyed the vivid experiences in her life. Maya Angelou’s works are well known and she is an eminent writer. One poem in particular that is well known is “I Know Why the Caged Bird...

987 words

Beowulf : Virtue And Community

Beowulf is set against a background of feuding and warfare amongst the Danes, Frisians, Jutes, Swedes, and the Geats. Heroes the likes of Beowulf and Wiglaf stand proudly among other figures from history such as Hygelac, Hrothgar, and Ingeld. Although, in a modern sense, the poem cannot be...

1 689 words

Archetypes And Ideals Of Beowulf And King

“A hero is someone who, in spite of weakness, doubt or not always knowing the answers, goes ahead and overcomes anyway”-Joseph Campbell. Stories have so much power connect you to another world and teach you lessons that are needed throughout history. Archetypes give the story a focal...

942 words

Beowulf and Grendel

Beowulf is a classical epic poem which describes Beowulf’s heroic deeds and his acts towards bringing justice and peace to the Scandinavian society by eradicating Grendel. The original manuscript (700-1000A.D.) and the modern film (2005) reveals significant differences between the...

3 463 words

Beowulf: Comparing Beowulf and Wiglaf

In the literary work of Beowulf, it is imperative to analyze the relationships between characters and how those relationships function to create new meaning or a better understanding of the literature as a whole. In Beowulf, it can be said that the characters of Beowulf and Wiglaf share parallels...

1 220 words

Retribution in Beowulf

Beowulf is an epic poem that, above all, gives us a vision of a time long ago; a time when the most important traits to have were courage and integrity. The only thing that could give such fame to somebody was heroic deeds and family lineage. Beowulf, as the example of pagan heroes, exhibited his...

1 121 words

Essay about The Victorian Life in the Novel A Christmas Carol

There are many pictures that 'A Christmas Carol' creates and in this essay I will show you all of them. This novella explores the many diverse types of life in the harsh Victorian era. From the Rich cruel citizens to the poor of poor like the Cratchit family. One of the pictures portrayed...

1 556 words

The Popularity of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Essay

I Think that 'A Christmas Carol'' by Charles Dickens is still popular today because it has a good moral story and people still enjoy a good old fashioned ghost story. This is because a lot of us are still interested in the afterlife and if such things as ghosts even exist we are...

1 296 words

Scrooge's Change in A Christmas Carol Essay

Dickens combines a description of hardships faced by the poor with a heart-rending sentimental celebration of the Christmas season. The novel contains dramatic and comic element as well as a deep felt moral theme. In the beginning of the novel Ebenezer Scrooge is portrayed as a hardhearted and...

2 268 words

The Comprehensibility of Scrooge in Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol'

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens is one of the most classic stories that has been embraced by Western culture. There is a certain timelessness to the entire story, in that it demonstrates the powerful transformation of an incredibly stilted and unlikeable character to that of someone who is...

1 200 words

Dickens' Use of Symbolism in A Christmas Carol Essay

Charles Dickens wrote a large number of novels but this particular novella was very popular as it told the story of a typical Christmas in Victorian times. The word 'Scrooge' derives from the character Scrooge in this novella, which proves that Dickens' story really did make an impact...

1 332 words

Love In Wuthering Heights Essay

The story of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights has been one of the most influential and powerful piece of literature ever written. After being published, it garnered a lot of interest because of the theme that was deemed misleading and critically unfit for society. The main theme of the...

1 678 words

The Setting of Wuthering Heights Essay

Wuthering Heights is a novel of passion, revenge, and the destructiveness of a love that is too fierce. The book takes place in the Yorkshire moors in New England in the late 18th century. Emily Brontë, the author of the tale, makes great use of the story’s Gothic landscape and setting...

784 words

The Invention Of Wings Of ' Wuthering Heights '

The Invention of Wings follows the peculiar institution of slavery through the eyes of two young girls, Sarah and Hetty. They both struggle with the realities of societal customs pitched against them. Sarah is futilely vying against the strong patriarchal customs of her society while Hetty has to...

1 540 words

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