Jane Austen Quotes

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.

44812

There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.

19495

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.

15993

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.

15839

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!

7720

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

6214

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

5883

Angry people are not always wise.

4914

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.

4691

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.

4198

I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.

4051

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.

4046

What are men to rocks and mountains?

3727

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.

3459

I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W.I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house this evening or never.

3258

I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.

3114

I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.

2326

Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.

2122

I have not the pleasure of understanding you.

1722

I may have lost my heart, but not my self-control.

1683
×
Sarah
Sarah online
CAN’T FIND YOUR TOPIC?
Let us write it for you!
START NOW