Free Essay Examples and Topics - Page 4 | Just Great DataBase

John Dryden - Absalom and Achitophel

Absalom and Achitophel is a landmark poetic political satire by John Dryden. The poem exists in two parts. The first part, of 1681, is undoubtedly by Dryden. The second part, of 1682, was written by another hand, most likely Nahum Tate, except for a few passages---including attacks on Thomas...

1 387 words

Adam Bede

Adam Bede takes into account various themes and it various manifestations Actually Adam Bede is a novel which dissects human mind and then analysis is done, which discloses a lot of themes underlying it. These themes range from social to psychological and to some extent from philosophical to...

1 479 words

Book Report on Farewell to Manzanar

In the early year of 1942, the families of Japanese people are being ordered to start a move to Manzanar, California; the Wakatsuki family is one of them. Many Japanese accept the move because they are afraid of Caucasian aggression, but some simply see it as an adventure. Families have to put on...

437 words

Themes in Adam Bede

Beauty Eliot contrasts inner and outer beauty throughout the novel to express the idea that external and internal realities do not always correspond. Although Hetty is more physically beautiful than Dinah, she is cold and ugly inside. Hetty’s outer beauty masks her inner ugliness, especially...

919 words

All the King's Men

The novel All the King’s Men was published in 1946 and written by Robert Penn Warren. The title of the novel is taken from a popular children’s nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty. The novel has won many awards and has been adapted into films in 1949 and 2006. Based in 1930s, this is a story...

336 words

Fathers and Sons: Nihilism

Turgenov's Fathers and Sons has several characters who hold strong views of the world. Pavel believes that Russia needs structure from such things as institution, religion, and class hierarchy. Madame Odintsov views the world as simple so long as she keeps it systematic and free from...

1 656 words

All the Kings Men - Tragedy Through Good Will

“Is it better to be feared or loved, if one cannot have both,” was once proposed by Machiavelli in The Prince, which to this day has a significant impact on the perspective of political empires and their rulers (Machiavelli). In Robert Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men...

1 081 words

Nihilism in Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons

Nihilism in Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons has several characters that hold strong views of the world. For example, Pavel believes that Russia needs structure from such things as institution, religion, and class hierarchy. On the other hand, Madame Odintzov views the world as simple so long as...

1 706 words

Commentary All the Kings Men

All the King’s Men Commentary #1 We left the bay, and lost the salt, sad, sweet, fishy smell of the tidelands out of our nostrils. We headed north again. It was darker now. The ground mist lay heavier on the fields, and in the dips of the road the mist frayed out over the slab and blunted...

865 words

Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

During the discussion, several articles were presented to the class. The subjects brought to light were the Russian economy during the 1850s, serfdom, and the question of whether Turgenev was obsolete or not. The articles on the Russian economy explained the state of transition the Russian economy...

332 words

Attitude Towards Women Fathers and Sons

To analyze the attitudes towards the women question and the most useful starting point would be to look at the representation of the liberated woman, Yevdoxia Kukshina, which can be contrasted with the representation of Bazarov’s mother or Nikolai Kirsanov’s wife, the women ideals of...

603 words

All the King's Men - the Dialectical Journal

Passage 1: In this first passage the author describes the scenic views of the rolling countryside as he and Willie Stark drive to Mason City for some quick press photos at Willies old house. The author spends a great deal of time in this passage detailing the landscape and introducing figures. The...

1 875 words

All the Kings Men Thesis Paper

In the novel, All the King’s Men written by Robert Penn Warren, Jack Burden and Willie Stark are paired as the two main characters. All the King’s Men is a unique novel because both Jack Burden and Willie Stark are considered dynamic characters, with each of them undergoing a...

1 107 words

Fathers and Sons - Many Contrasting Ideas, People and Places

In Ivan Turgenev's novel, 'Fathers and Sons,' there are many contrasting ideas, people, and places; between Pavel and Bazarov, Madame Odintsov's liberal views versus Bazarov's nihilistic views, the older generation versus the new one. The two places, however, that I think...

715 words

Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People

Introduction Much of Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People (1882) might be traced to the following point of origin: the hurt, the distress and disgust he felt at the hostile reception given in 1881 by the Norwegian public and critics to Ghosts. Within a year of this bitterly resented...

1 470 words

An Enemy of the People Book Review

A compelling book should consist of an array of complex ideas and leave the reader with a sense of satisfaction. That book must only regretfully leave the hands of its reader and enthusiastically return. An Enemy of the People written by Henrik Ibsen and published by Oxford University Press...

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An Enemy of the People Critical Analysis

In “An Enemy of the People,” Henrik Ibsen adopts the theme that the majority of people are always wrong. This is to say that if one wishes to find truth in the world he must look to the minority of people. There is great wisdom in these words. The majority of people are not the most...

602 words

An Enemy of the People - Henrik Ibsen

Contemporary social universal issues are reflected in common themes that are evident in extensively appreciated texts. Written by Henrik Ibsen, An Enemy of the People is a prominent example of a text that incorporates universal topics which are those of integrity and environmental damage. Similarly...

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An Enemy of the People

Conflict appears in many different shapes and forms, internal and external, small and large scale, but all force characters to make difficult decisions. Henrik Ibsen’s play, An Enemy of the People, focuses on the internal conflict of Dr. Thomas Stockmann as he chooses between crippling his...

565 words

Themes in 'Arms and the Man' by Bernard Shaw

The title 'Arms and the Man' derives from the opening lines of the popular epic of Virgil, 'Aeneid' : 'I sing of Arms and the Man' However, as Virgil highly praises war as described by its heroes, Shaw's aim in writing 'Arms and the Man' is to provide a more...

635 words

Realism in Arms and the Man

Realism was a general movement in 19th-century theatre that developed a set of dramatic and theatrical conventions with the aim of bringing a greater fidelity of real life to texts and performances. It shared many stylistic choices with naturalism, including a focus on everyday (middle-class) drama...

1 571 words

Arms and the Man Essay

The title of Arms and The Man is chose after careful consideration. The title is both apt chosen attractive and the dramatist’s choices justified. It is an ironical reversal of Virgil’s original intention. Virgil in his famous epic The Aencid recounts the martial exploits and...

408 words

Arms and the Man - Raina Petkoff

Raina is one of Shaw's most delightful heroines from his early plays. In the opening scenes of the play, she is presented as being a romantically idealistic person in love with the noble ideal of war and love; yet, she is also aware that she is playing a game, that she is a poseuse who enjoys...

518 words

Arms and the Man as a Problem Play

Bernard Shaw was a dramatist with a purpose. His purpose was to build up a kingdom of heaven on the face of the earth. He believes that God has given us a beautiful world that nothing but our folly keeps from being it a paradise. We entertain airy notion and fantastic emotion regarding all...

3 131 words

Daisy Buchanan's Sardonic Perspective in "The Great Gatsby" Essay

In F. Scott Fitzgerald's third book, The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses his narrator, Nick Carraway as a vital tool to comprehend the purposefulness of this story. Imagine having the story in some other characters point of view, a cynical and more sardonic point of view. Daisy Buchanan's...

1 147 words

Daisy in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Throughout the novel The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the character of Daisy Buchanan undergoes many noticeable changes. Daisy is a symbol of wealth and of promises broken. She is a character we grow to feel sorry for but probably should not. Born Daisy Fay in Louisville, Kentucky, Daisy...

1 308 words

The Theme of Fatalism in Antigone

Tragedies involve a regular person experiencing a reversal in fortune because he or she results in a catharsis arousing fear and pity of the audience. In Greek tragedies, fatalism plays a dominant role in doing so as one is not a free agent because future(in tragedies, reversal of fortune) is...

1 269 words

Roles of Women in Antigone

Despite the male dominant society of Ancient Greece, the women in Sophocles’ play Antigone all express capabilities of powerful influence and each individually possess unique characteristics, showing both similarities and contrasts. The women in the play are a pivotal aspect that keeps the...

2 596 words

Characterization of Antigone

Sophocles’ tragic drama, Antigone, presents to the reader a full range of characters: static and dynamic, flat and round; they are portrayed mostly through the showing technique.  In “Sophocles’ Praise of Man and the Conflicts of the Antigone,” Charles Paul Segal takes...

2 612 words

Antigone by Sophocles - The Characters Analisis

Antigone is story of divine retribution and human imperfectness. In this tragedy a powerful king, Creon is brought down by the Gods because of his contempt against their divine laws and true justice is shown to triumph at the end. Creon makes the mistake of putting his personal views over and...

1 565 words

The Tragedy of Antigone Essay

It is plain to see what about the character of Antigone it is that makes this a tragedy. Tragedy is defined as a dramatic composition dealing with a serious or somber theme, and this story fits all these criteria. First of all, it involves a tragic course of events that involved both of her...

1 355 words

Literary Analysis Of Emma By Jane Austen

In Jane Austen’s novel, Emma, protagonist Emma avoids her own transformation by her attempts to transform others. However, Emma experiences her coming-of-age through the stable characters of those around her. Austen reveals how self-transformation is necessary in maturing and establishing...

1 669 words

Emma Book Report

Emma, authored by Jane Austen, tells a story of a wealthy young woman 's schemes to match up her new, and much more poor, friend with the town 's unsuspecting bachelors. What is revealed, however, is not Emma 's skills in match-making, but her inability to see the true feelings of...

1 174 words

Emma by Jane Austen Essay

Emma is more unpleasant than appealing. Discuss with reference to the first 9 chapters. The first line of the novel ‘Emma’, by Jane Austen, claims Emma to be ‘handsome, clever, and rich’, this sums up Emma’s character completely. It is important to list these...

1 554 words

The Flawed Character of Emma Woodhouse in Jane Austen's Emma

In Emma Woodhouse, Jane Austen has created a wonderfully flawed heroine. Had Emma been perfect, her situation would have been of no interest to anyone; her flaws are what interest both reader and critic. Peter W. Graham is interested particularly with the first page of the novel where Emma is...

2 301 words

Capturing Real Life in Jane Austen's Emma Essay

Jane Austen deliberately confined herself to the realistic portrayal of a segment of contemporary English life-upper middle-class society. The heroine, Emma Woodhouse, lives on her father's estate at Hartfield which is in effect an adjunct of the village of Highbury 'in spite of its...

2 899 words

Is The Merchant of Venice an Anti-Semitic Play? Essay

The Merchant of Venice features a Jewish character that is abused and slandered by nearly every character in the play. Throughout the play the behavior of these characters seems justified. In this way, The Merchant of Venice appears to be an anti-Semitic play. However, The Merchant of Venice...

1 512 words

Tragedy in The Merchant of Venice

According to dictionary.com, a tragedy is a form of art based on human suffering; furthermore, it is a dramatic composition, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society...

1 526 words

Religion in The Merchant of Venice Essay

Religion was a major factor in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Religion motivated action and reasoning. In Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice,” religion was more than a belief in a higher being; it reflected moral standards and ways of living. In the “Merchant of...

2 073 words

Background and Influence: Merchant of Venice

In England, during the lifetime of William Shakespeare, oppression was occurring against people of different races, ethnicities, and even genders. The religious conflicts stemmed from the differing translations of G-d's word. This created conflicts and segregation by religion, turning some...

1 993 words

Stereotypes and The Merchant of Venice

Stereotypes are a fixed image of all members of a culture, group, or race usually based on limited and inaccurate information resulted from the minimal contact with this stereotyped groups. stereotypes have many forms; people are stereotyped according to their religion, race, ethnicity, age, gender...

1 680 words

Othello is Solely Responsible for his Downfall in Shakespeare's Othello

I believe Iago has nothing to do with Othello's downfall as Othello is an easily mislead man who is easily influenced. Not only did Iago not directly say Desdemona was having an affair, he neither didn’t give proof to confirm the rumours. By Othello believing the lies, it surfaces his...

1 841 words

The Trials of Othello

In Shakespeare's Othello there are three main trials that build the plot of the play. In each of these "trials", Iago though not always the judge tries to be the puppet master. He does this by focusing on each characters fatal flaw.  In the play the three main trails go as...

934 words

Othello as the Greater Evil in William Shakespeare’s Othello

What makes one person to be considered evil, while another is considered righteous? The character Iago, in William Shakespeare’s Othello, could be considered evil because of his plot against Cassio and Othello. Othello, could be considered righteous, because he believes his wife has been...

1 947 words

Shakespeare's Othello - There Would be No Othello Without Iago

Though the name of the play written by William Shakespeare is called "Othello," the character Othello is not the main character, but rather Iago is. Iago is the character who drives the play, he is the one who makes things happen. Without his greed and hated, there would be no play at all...

1 181 words

Diction of Othello

Diction is the author's choice of words, taking into account correctness, clearness, and effectiveness. Shakespeare's works focus on human problems and resolving them. The use of Shakespeare’s diction throughout Othello is very unique because he is very clear in the emotions and the...

1 567 words

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak Essay

Best known for his book the Book Thief, Australian born author Markus Zusak has been writing for young adults since the age of seventeen(Grade Saver). Born in Melbourne, Australia to German and Austrian immigrants, Markus Zusak lived a very humble and quite life. However being the youngest of four...

1 391 words

Essay on Resistance in The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Alphonse Elric from Full Metal Alchemist says, "humankind cannot gain anything without first giving something in return. To obtain, something of equal value must be lost." In the novel, The Book Thief, Markus Zusak portrays the multiple transactions humanity experiences but in return...

1 113 words

Analysis Essay Of The Book ' The Book Thief '

Imagery: “First the colors. Then the humans. That’s usually how I see things. Or at least, how I try.” (1) Describe: The first passage of “The Book Thief,” already leaves the reader questioning what on Earth these words could mean; however, the answer to this question...

2 145 words

Guilt in The Book Thief

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is set in Nazi Germany in World War II. Narrated by Death, the novel takes as its protagonist Liesel Meminger, a girl who grows up in a foster home where Jews aren’t seen as evil, in a departure from attitudes in the rest of Nazi Germany. Max, a Jew living in...

1 017 words

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