A Midsummer Night's Dream Quotes - Page 2 | Just Great DataBase

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O hell! to choose love by another's eyes!" "Or, if there were a sympathy in choice, War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it, Making it momentany as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream; Brief as the lighting in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth, And ere a man hath pwer to say, 'Behold!' The jaws of darkness do devour it up: So quick bright things come to confusion.

9

The course of true love never die run smooth

9

Because it is a customary cross, As die to love as thoughts, and dreams, and sighs, Wishes, and tears, poor fancy's followers.

8

Nay! Faith, let me not play a woman! I have a beard coming!

8

Give me your hands, if we be friends, and Robin shall restore amends.

8

Be as thou wast wont to be.

8

in the night, imagining some fear,How easy is a bush supposed a bear!

8

O hell! to choose love by another's eye.

8

Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind.

7

Over hill, over dale,Thorough bush, thorough brier,Over park, over pale,Thorough flood, thorough fire,I do wander everywhere,Swifter than the moon's sphere;And I serve the fairy queen,To dew her orbs upon the green.The cowslips tall her pensioners be:In their gold coats spots you see;Those be rubies, fairy favours,In those freckles live their savours:I must go seek some dewdrops hereAnd hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.Farewell, thou lob of spirits; I'll be gone:Our queen and all our elves come here anon.

7

I will go tell him of Hermia's flight:Then to the wood will he to-morrow nightPursue her; and for this intelligenceIf I have thanks, it is a dear expense:But herein mean I to enrich my pain, To have his sight thither and back again.

7

Get you gone, you dwarf,You minimus of hindering knotgrass made,You bead, you acorn!

7

Be as thou wast wont to be.See as thou wast wont to see.

6

Over hill, over dale,    Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale,    Thorough flood, thorough fire, I do wander everywhere,

6

And as imagination bodies forthThe forms of things unknown, the poet’s penTurns them to shapes and gives to airy nothingA local habitation and a name

5

Oh, take the sense, sweet, of my innocence.Love takes the meaning in love’s conference. I mean that my heart unto yours is knitSo that but one heart we can make of it.

5

Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason for that: and yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days; the more the pity that some honest neighbours will not make them friends.

4

When in that moment,—so it came to pass,— Titania wak'd, and straightway lov'd an ass.

4

And thought she be but little, she is fierce.

3

What hempen homespuns have we swaggering here...

3

He cannot be heard of. Out of doubt he is transported

3

Let me play the lion too: I will roar that I will do any man's heart good to hear me; I will roar that I will make the duke say 'Let him roar again, let him roar again.

3

The will of man is by his reason sway'd;

3

Brief as the lightning in the collied night;That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and Earth,And ere a man hath power to say "Behold!"The jaws of darkness do devour it up.So quick bright things come to confusion.

3

So far be distant; and good night, sweet friend.Thy love ne’er alter till thy sweet life end!

3

The more my prayer, the lesser is my grace.

3

Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh,Your vows to her and me, put in two scales,Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

3

am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you: Use me but as your spaniel, spurn me, strike me, Neglect me, lose me; only give me leave, Unworthy as I am, to follow you. What worser place can I beg in your love, And yet a place of high respect with me,— Than to be usèd as you use your dog?

2

I must to the barber's, mounsieur; for methinks I am     marvellous hairy about the face; and I am such a tender ass, if     my hair do but tickle me I must scratch.

2

Who will not change a raven for a dove?

2

But earthlier happy is the rose distill'd Than that which, withering on the virgin thorn, Grows, lives, and dies, in single blessedness.

2

Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms. Fairies, be gone, and be all ways away.

2

TITANIA My Oberon! what visions have I seen! Methought I was enamour'd of an ass.

2

Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hourDraws on apace; four happy days bring inAnother moon: but, O, methinks, how slowThis old moon wanes! she lingers my desires,Like to a step-dame or a dowagerLong withering out a young man revenue.

2

I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was: man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was--there is no man can tell what. Methought I was,--and methought I had,--but man is but a patched fool, ifhe will offer to say what methought I had. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream: it shall be called Bottom's Dream, because it hath no bottom...

2

How Low am I, thou painted Maypole? Speak:How Low am I? I am not yet so LowBut that my Nails can reach unto thine Eyes

2

In maiden meditation, fancy-free.Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell.It fell upon a little western flower,Before milk-white, now purple with love’s wound.

1

The raging rocks And shivering shocks Shall break the locks        Of prison gates: And Phibbus' car Shall shine from far, And make and mar        The foolish Fates.

1

Weaving spiders, come not here, Hence, you long legged spinners, hence! Beetles black, approach not here, worm nor snail, do no offense.

1

I swear to thee by Cupid's strongest bow, By his best arrow, with the golden head, By the simplicity of Venus' doves, By that which knitteth souls and prospers loves, And by that fire which burn'd the Carthage queen, When the false Trojan under sail was seen,— By all the vows that ever men have broke, In number more than ever women spoke,—

1

Four days will quickly steep themselves in night; 
Four nights will quickly dream away the time;...

Act I, Scene 1, Line 8

I was with Hercules and Cadmus once, 
When in a wood of Crete they bay'd the bear...

Act IV, Scene 1, Line 1667

'Tis strange my Theseus, that these 
lovers speak of.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 1830

But all the story of the night told over, 
And all their minds transfigured so together,...

Act V, Scene 1, Line 1853

I love not to see wretchedness o'er charged 
And duty in his service perishing.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 1925

He says they can do nothing in this kind.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 1928

 

Indeed he hath played on his prologue like a child 
on a recorder; a sound, but not in government.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 1965

This is the silliest stuff that ever I heard.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 2055

It must be your imagination then, and not theirs.

Act V, Scene 1, Line 2058

I am aweary of this moon: would he would change!

Act V, Scene 1, Line 2091