Hank Rearden

Hank Rearden embodies the romantic hero in love with Dagny Taggart. His fate is extremely unhappy because he is married to an unloved woman. His true sympathy suddenly disappears from the city, causing a storm of negative assumptions. When Dagny appears with a new guy, Hank is forced to come to terms with the status quo and share her passion.

The reason for everything is his commitment to traditional foundations and the fear of appearing ridiculous in the public opinion. He is not a heroic personage that can be seen on the pages of the story. Hank represents an ordinary person, not distinguished by originality of judgments or brilliant achievements.

The family torments Hank, each time emphasizing his inconsistency. Wife scolds his lack of initiative, demanding more work. Being in constant tension, the principal decides to break his family ties for the sake of own peace of mind. Rearden does not accept the negative values suggested by Galt. He frequently has an aversion to his nature, which prevents him from joining Atlantis.

Hank is afraid of losing emotions control and transforming own views. He respects his spouse, despite her abominable behavior. Mistress is a whole guilt complex because the principal used to sacrifice feelings for the sake of decency. Love for Dagny is identical to his work. But he is ashamed of forbidden sentiments, being in the hands of blackmailers. During the novel, Hank seeks a balance between personal values and the real world, trying to reconcile them with each other. It is a high-level morality that separates him from Galt’s supporters. Ultimately, he joins the strike, sharing the correctness of this step. He does not seek to overthrow the government but only to make adjustments to working conditions. Hank plays the role of an outside observer, allowing you to look at Galt's philosophy from the standpoint of an ordinary individual.

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Hank Rearden in the Essays