Don Quixote Quotes - Page 2 | Just Great DataBase

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...to retire is not to flee, and there is no wisdom in waiting when danger outweighs hope, and it is the part of wise men to preserve themselves to-day for to-morrow, and not risk all in one day.

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Your grace, come back, Senor Don Quixote, I swear to God you're charging sheep !

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What I can tell your grace is that it deals with truths, and they are truths so appealing and elegant that no lies can equal them.

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After the gratifications of brutish appetites are past, the greatest pleasure then is to get rid of that which entertained it.

Sex
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Finally, having quite lost his wits, he was seized with the strangest conceit any madman in the world has ever had. It seemed to him that it was requisite and necessary, for the augmentation of his honor and for the benefit of the commonwealth, that he should become a knight-errant and ride throughout the world with his horse and his arms to seek adventures.

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It seemed to us that all people to a greater or lesser degree belong to one of these two types, that almost every one of us resembles either Don Quixote or Hamlet.

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Let each look to himself and not try to make out white black, and black white; for each of us is as God made him, aye, and often worse.

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Open thine arms and receive, too, thy son Don Quixote, who, if he comes vanquished by the arm of another, comes victor over himself, which, as he himself has told me, is the greatest victory anyone can desire.

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In the shadow of feigned cripples and false wounds come the strong arms of thieves and very healthy drunkards.

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With these meager scraps of Latin and the like, you may perhaps be taken for a scholar, which is honorable and profitable these days.

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We have come to the church, Sancho.

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In a village of La Mancha, the name of which I have no desire to call to mind, there lived not long since one of those gentlemen that keep a lance in the lance-rack, an old buckler, a lean hack, and a greyhound for coursing.

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But I have heard it said, said Don Quixote, that troubles take wing for the man who can sing.

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Bear in mind, Sancho, that one man is no more than another, unless he does more than another.

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...let his sin be his punishment, let him eat it with his bread, and let that be an end to it.

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That is the nature of women, said Don Quixote. They reject the man who loves them and love the man who despises them.

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Only make yourself honey and the flies will suck you.

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This fierce basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, supercilious wretch, will neither seek, serve, own, nor follow you in any shape whatever.

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Love is invisible, and comes in and goes out as he likes, without anyone calling him to account for what he does.

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It is by rugged paths like these they go That scale the heights of immortality, Unreached by those that falter here below.

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...in the worst of circumstances, the hypocrite who pretends to be good does less harm than the public sinner.

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And the first thing I have got to say is, that for my own part I hold my master Don Quixote to be stark mad, though sometimes he says things that, to my mind, and indeed everybody's that listens to him, are so wise, and run in such a straight furrow, that Satan himself could not have said them better; but for all that, really, and beyond all question, it's my firm belief he is cracked.

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In short, to sum up all in a few words, or in a single one, I may tell you I am Don Quixote of La Mancha, otherwise called 'The Knight of the Rueful Countenance;' for though self-praise is degrading, I must perforce sound my own sometimes, that is to say, when there is no one at hand to do it for me.

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But our depraved age does not deserve to enjoy such a blessing as those ages enjoyed when knights-errant took upon their shoulders the defence of kingdoms, the protection of damsels, the succour of orphans and minors, the chastisement of the proud, and the recompense of the humble.

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The landlord replied he had no chickens, for the kites had stolen them.

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Don't you be worried or annoyed, Sancho, about any comments you hear, or there will never be an end to them. Keep a safe conscience and let people say what they like: trying to still gossips' tongues is like putting up doors in open fields. If the governor leaves office rich they say he's a thief, and if he leaves it poor they say he's a milksop and a fool.

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Since Cervantes’s magnificent Knight’s quest has cosmological scope and reverberation, no object seems beyond reach.

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Plunge, scoundrel, rogue, monster—for such I take thee to be—plunge, I say, into the mare magnum of their histories; and if thou shalt find that any squire ever said or thought what thou hast said now, I will let thee nail it on my forehead, and give me, over and above, four sound slaps in the face.

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Do you mean to say that the story is finished? said Don Quixote. As finished as my mother, said Sancho.

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Somewhere in la Mancha, in a place whose name I do not care to remember, a gentleman lived not long ago, one of those who has a lance and ancient shield on a shelf and keeps a skinny nag and a greyhound for racing.

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Many people go looking for wool and come back shorn.

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At this point they came in sight of thirty forty windmills that there are on plain, and as soon as Don Quixote saw them he said to his squire, "Fortune is arranging matters for us better than we could have shaped our desires ourselves, for look there, friend Sancho Panza, where thirty or more monstrous giants present themselves, all of whom I mean to engage in battle and slay, and with whose spoils we shall begin to make our fortunes; for this is righteous warfare, and it is God's good service to sweep so evil a breed from off the face of the earth." "What giants?" said Sancho Panza.

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But I'll take you, Don Clown stuffed with garlic," said Don Quixote, "and tie you to a tree as naked as when your mother brought you forth, and give you, not to say three thousand three hundred, but six thousand six hundred lashes, and so well laid on that they won't be got rid of if you try three thousand three hundred times; don't answer me a word or I'll tear your soul out.

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Many were the offenses to be undone, the wrongs to be rectified, the grievances to be redressed, the abuses to be corrected and the debts to be satisfied.

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But to give him anything to drink was impossible, or would have been so had not the landlord bored a reed, and putting one end in his mouth poured the wine into him through the other; all which he bore with patience rather than sever the ribbons of his helmet.

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By the one God, Sancho, no more proverbs.

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The Panza is here," said Sancho, before anyone could reply, "and Don Quixotissimus too; and so, most distressedest Duenissima, you may say what you willissimus, for we are all readissimus to do you any servissimus.

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And as the wicked are always ungrateful, and necessity leads to evil doing, and immediate advantage overcomes all considerations of the future, Ginés, who was neither grateful nor well-principled, made up his mind to steal Sancho Panza's ass.

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Remember that I'm old enough to give advice, and the advice I'm giving you now is exactly right, and a bird in the hand is better than a vulture in the air,...

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We know already ample experience that it does not require much cleverness or much learning to be a governor, for there are a hundred round about us that scarcely know how to read.

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Take care, Sancho," said Samson; "honours change manners, and perhaps when you find yourself a governor you won't know the mother that bore you.

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A good joke, that!" returned Don Quixote. "Books that have been printed with the king's licence, and with the approbation of those to whom they have been submitted, and read with universal delight, and extolled by great and small, rich and poor, learned and ignorant, gentle and simple, in a word by people of every sort, of whatever rank or condition they may be—that these should be lies!

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Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind. - Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de,

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Love and war are exactly alike. It is lawful to use tricks and slights to obtain a desired end.

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So he went on stringing together these and other absurdities, all in the style of those his books had taught him, imitating their language as well as he could; and all the while he rode so slowly and the sun mounted so rapidly and with such fervour that it was enough to melt his brains if he had any.

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How is it possible that things so trivial and so easy to remedy can have the power to perplex and absorb an intelligence as mature as yours, and one so ready to demolish and pass over much greater difficulties?

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I have always heard it said, Sancho, that to do good to boors is to throw water into the sea.

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Thy enterprises speed, Didst thou the light mid Libya's sands   Or Jaca's rocks first see?

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This, however, is of but little importance to our tale; it will be enough not to stray a hair's breadth from the truth in the telling of it.

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Thou knowest that my voice is sweet,   That is if thou dost hear; And I am moulded in a form   Somewhat below the mean.

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