Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Page 6 | Just Great DataBase

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I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love

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Will you tell me how long you have loved him?""It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began.

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Cuando alguien ha perdido mi buena opinión, perdida la tiene para siempre.

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She was in no humour for conversation with anyone but himself; and to him she had hardly courage to speak.

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All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.

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Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done.

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Do you not want to know who has taken it?" cried his wife impatiently.

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…Elizabeth, agitated and confused, rather knew that she was happy, than felt herself to be so…

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but without scheming to do wrong, or to make others unhappy, there may be error, and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness, want of attention to other people's feelings, and want of resolution, will do the business.

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Estaba meditando sobre el gran placer que pueden causar un par de ojos bonitos en el rostro de una mujer hermosa.

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Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design—to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone.

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Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him, was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody; and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger.

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And this," cried Darcy, as he walked with quick steps across the room, "is your opinion of me! This is the estimation in which you hold me! I thank you for explaining it so fully.

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Indeed, sir, I have not the least intention of dancing. I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner.

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I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.

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There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.

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There seemed a gulf impassable between them.

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Let go of the past because its remembrance will give you pleasure.

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Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried. Her father had most cruelly mortified her, by what he said of Mr. Darcy's indifference, and she could do nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she might have fancied too much.

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pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.

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Keep your breath to cool your porridge'; and I shall keep mine to swell my song.

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The power of doing anything with quickness is always prized much by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance.

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Ms. Bennett, do you know who I am? I am not accustomed to being spoken to in such a manner.

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[W]here other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.

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I beg your pardon; one knows exactly what to think.

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Don't keep coughing so, Kitty, for Heaven's sake! Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.

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Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for my sake that his manners are thus softened... It is impossible that he should still love me.

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A scheme of which every part promises delight, can never be successful; and general disappointment is only warded off by the defence of some little peculiar vexation.

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She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.

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I am heartily ashamed of myself, Lizzy. But don't despair, it'll pass; and no doubt more quickly than it should.

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And what am I to do on the occasion? -- It seems an hopeless business.

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But do not be cast down. Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret

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I was uncomfortable enough. I was very uncomfortable, I may say unhappy.

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You have bewitched me, body and soul.

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Her mind was less difficult to develop.

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Mr. Wickham is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends - whether he may be equally capable of retaining them is less certain.

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Miss Bingley's congratulations to her brother, on his approaching marriage, were all that was affectionate and insincere.

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Oh hang kitty; what has she to do with it? Come, be quick. Be quick. Where is your sash?

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-La imaginación de las mujeres hace que concibamos demasiadas ilusiones respecto de los hombres.-Y los hombres procuran que así sea

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I shall be glad to have the library to myself as soon as may be.

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Come Darcy,' said he. 'I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing around by yourself in this stupid manner.

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A man who had felt less, might.

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You do not make allowance enough for difference of situation and temper.

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it is often nothing but our own vanity that decieves us

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If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you."Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever."Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.

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Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.

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When a woman has five grown-up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.

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¡Qué agradable es pasar así una velada! Declaro que no hay placer como la lectura. ¡Cuánto más pronto cansa cualquier otra cosa que un libro! Cuando tenga casa propia me creeré desgraciada si no poseo una excelente biblioteca.

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Mr. Wickham was the happy man towards whom almost every female eye was turned, and Elizabeth was the happy woman by whom he finally seated himself

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Darcy: 'I certainly have not the talent which some people possess, of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.'Elizabeth:'My fingers do not move over this instrument in the masterly manner which I see so many women's do. They have not the same force or rapidity, and do not produce the same expression. But then I have always supposed it to be my own fault -- because I would not take the trouble of practicing. It is not that I do not believe my fingers as capable as any other woman's of superior execution.

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