Brave New World Quotes

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Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly -- they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.

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But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin.

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Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn't nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.

1547

If one's different, one's bound to be lonely.

1430

I want to know what passion is. I want to feel something strongly.

1342

Kiss me till I'm in a coma. Hug me, honey, snuggly.

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If one’s different, one’s bound to be lonely.

3

Never put off till to-morrow the fun you can have today,

3

Was and will make me ill, I take a gramme and only am. 

3

We don't want to change. Every change is a menace to stability. That's another reason why we're so chary of applying new inventions.

2

Mental excess could produce, for its own purposes, the voluntary blindness and deafness of deliberate solitude, the artificial impotence of asceticism.

2

Bernard was duly grateful (it was an enormous comfort to have his friend again) and also duly resentful (it would be pleasure to take some revenge on Helmholtz for his generosity).

2

He defined philosophy as the finding of bad reason for what one believes by instinct. As if one believed anything by instinct! One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them.

2

that is the secret of happiness and virtue—liking what you’ve got to do. All conditioning aims at that: making people like their un-escapable social destiny.

2

But God doesn’t change. Men do, though. What difference does that make? All the difference in the world,

2

You can’t consume much if you sit still and read books.

2

One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them. Finding bad reasons for what one believes for other bad reasons—that’s philosophy. People believe in God because they’ve been conditioned to believe in God.

2

How can you talk about not wanting to be a part of the social body? We can't do without anyone!

2

For particulars, as every one knows, make for virtue and happiness; generalities are intellectually necessary evils. Not philosophers but fretsawyers and stamp collectors compose the backbone of society.

2

Impulse arrested spills over, and the flood is feeling, the flood is passion, the flood is even madness: it depends on the force of the current, the height and strength of the barrier. The unchecked stream flows smoothly down its appointed channels into a calm well-being.

1

The greater a man’s talents, the greater his power to lead astray. It is better that one should suffer than that many should be corrupted.

1

I ate civilization. It poisoned me; I was defined. And then, I ate my own wickedness.

1

He held out his right hand in the moonlight. From the cut on his wrist the blood was still oozing. Every few seconds a drop fell, dark, almost colourless in the dead light. Drop, drop, drop. Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow. . .He had discovered the Time and Death and God.

1

Christianity without tears—that’s what soma is.

1

You’ve got to choose between happiness and what people used to call high art. We’ve sacrificed the high art.

1

Reuben was the child of Polish-speaking parents.’ The Director interrupted himself. ‘You know what Polish is, I suppose?’ ‘A dead language.

1

If you’re a human being, you’ll be seeing something of both, because we’ve always wanted things both ways.

1

And that, put in the Director sententiously, that is the secret of happiness and virtue—liking what you’ve got to do. All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny.

1

That which had made Helmholtz so uncomfortably aware of being himself and all alone was too much ability.

1

He would think of Heaven and London and Our Lady of Acoma and the rows and rows of babies in clean bottles and Jesus flying up and Linda flying up and the great Director of World hatcheries and Awonawilona.

1

All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny.

1

But all the same, insisted the Savage, it is natural to believe in God when you’re alone—quite alone, in the night, thinking about death … But people never are alone now, said Mustapha Mond. We make them hate solitude; and we arrange their lives so that it’s almost impossible for them ever to have it.

1

How does he manifest himself now? asked the Savage. Well, he manifests himself as an absence; as though he weren’t there at all.

1

Imagine a factory staffed by Alphas—that is to say by separate and unrelated individuals of good heredity and conditioned so as to be capable (within limits) of making a free choice and assuming responsibilities. Imagine it!

1

Yes," Mustapha Mond was saying, "that's another item in the cost of stability. It isn't only art that's incompatible with happiness; it's also science. Science is dangerous; we have to keep it most carefully chained and muzzled.

1

Shut lips, sleeping faces,Every stopped machine,The dumb and littered placesWhere crowds have been:.All silences rejoice,Weep (loudly or low),Speak-but with the voiceOf whom, I do not know.

1

Home, home - a few small rooms, stiflingly over-inhabited by a man, by a periodically teeming woman, by rabble of boys and girls of all ages. No air, no space; an understerilized prison; darkness, disease and smells.

1

He let out the amazing truth. For a very long period before the time of Our Ford, and even for some generations afterwards, erotic play between children had been regarded as abnormal (there was a roar of laughter); and not only abnormal, actually immoral (no!): and had therefore been rigorously suppressed.

1

The students nodded, emphatically agreeing with a statement which upwards of sixty-two thousand repetitions in the dark had made them accept, not merely as true, but as axiomatic, self-evident, utterly indisputable.

1

Where there are wars, where there are divided allegiances, where there are temptations to be resisted, objects of love to be fought for or defended—there, obviously, nobility and heroism have some sense. But there aren’t any wars nowadays.

1

And in effect the sultry darkness into which the students now followed him was visible and crimson, like the darkness of closed eyes on a summer’s afternoon.

1

They’re well off; they’re safe; they’re never ill; they’re not afraid of death; they’re blissfully ignorant of passion and old age; they’re plagued with no mothers or fathers; they’ve got no wives, or children, or lovers to feel strongly about; they’re so conditioned that they practically can’t help behaving as they ought to behave.

1

Above them, in ten successive layers of dormitory, the little boys and girls who were still young enough to need an afternoon sleep were as busy as every one else, though they did not know it, listening unconsciously to hypnopædic lessons in hygiene and sociability, in class-consciousness and the toddler’s love-life.

1

Crowds of lower-caste workers were queued up in front of the monorail station—seven or eight hundred Gamma, Delta and Epsilon men and women, with not more than a dozen faces and statures between them.

1

All right then, said the savage defiantly, I’m claiming the right to be unhappy.

1

Imagine the folly of allowing people to play elaborate games which do nothing whatever to increase consumption. It’s

1

Near Shepherd’s Bush two thousand Beta-Minus mixed doubles were playing Riemann-surface tennis.

1

She looked up with a certain anxiety. 'But you don't think I'm too plump, do you?'He shook his head.Like so much meat.'You think I'm all right.' Another nod. 'In every way?''Perfect.' he said aloud. And inwardly, 'She thinks of herself that way. She doesn't mind being meat.

1

the lust for power can be just as completely satisfied by suggesting people into loving their servitude as by flogging and kicking them into obedience.

1

But I do," he insisted. "It makes me feel as though …" he hesitated, searching for words with which to express himself, "as though I were more me, if you see what I mean. More on my own, not so completely a part of something else. Not just a cell in the social body. Doesn't it make you feel like that, Lenina?

1