Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Page 3 | Just Great DataBase

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You expect me to account for opinions which you choose to call mine, but which I have never acknowledged.

61

I have the highest respect for your nerves, they are my old friends.

58

My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them──by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents.

57

I do not find it easy to talk to people I don't know.

56

Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eye, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of feelings, which, in proving of what importance she was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable.

56

It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.

56

It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.

52

I do not cough for my own amusement.

49

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.

47

Next to being married, a girl likes being crossed in love a little now and again.

46

Vanity, not love, has been my folly.

46

I love you. Most ardently.

43

I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.

43

my courage always rises with every attempt to intimidate me.

43

She attracted him more than he liked.

42

Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me capable of that. After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to all your relations.-Elizabeth Bennet

42

Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.

42

There are very few who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement

40

It sometimes is a disadvantage to be so very guarded. If a woman conceals her affection from the object of it, she may loose the opportunity of fixing him.

39

It's a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

38

It was absolutely necessary to interrupt him now.

38

The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke.

35

Oh! said she, I heard you before, but I could not immediately determine what to say in reply. You wanted me, I know, to say ‘Yes,’ that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt. I have, therefore made up my mind to tell you, that I do not want to dance a reel at all--and now despise me if you dare. Indeed I do not dare.

35

It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.

34

Cuanto más conozco el mundo, más me irrita, y todos los días confirmo mi creencia en la inconstancia del carácter humano y en la poca que me inspiran las apariencias de mérito o talento.

34

Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?"Sometimes. One must speak a little, you know. It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together, and yet for the advantage of some, conversation ought to be so arranged as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.

34

I should infinitely prefer a book...

34

The power of doing any thing with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. - Mr Darcy

33

Maybe it’s that I find it hard to forgive the follies and vices of others, or their offenses against me. My good opinion, once lost, is lost forever.

33

If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time.

33

And you are never to stir out of doors till you can prove that you have spent ten minutes of every day in a rational manner.

32

Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.

32

I am all astonishment.

31

Do you dance, Mr. Darcy?"Darcy: "Not if I can help it!"Sir William: "What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing, after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished societies."Mr. Darcy: "Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world; every savage can dance.

30

We can all begin freely—a slight preference is natural enough; but there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement.

30

This is an evening of wonders, indeed!

30

I often think," she said, "that there is nothing so bad as parting with one's friends. One seems to forlorn without them.

30

She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she hardly knew of what. She became jealous of his esteem, when she could no longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there seemed the least chance of gaining intelligence. She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

29

I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness.

29

Pride is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed, that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what would have others think of us.

29

You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these last twenty years at least.

28

Money is the best recipe for happiness.

28

There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.

28

She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.

28

You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.

27

I must have my share in the conversation…

27

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.

26

Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.

26

Everything nourishes what is strong already

25

He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and every body hoped that he would never come there again.

24
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