Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Page 4 | Just Great DataBase

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My style of writing is very diffrent from yours.

24

Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret.

24

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents.

24

Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?

23

Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who had made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

22

If you will thank me, let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you, might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe, I thought only of you.

22

In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will no longer be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

21

En compañía de un libro uno se aburre mucho menos.

21

My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.

21

How clever you are, to know something of which you are ignorant.

21

If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him; and it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in the dark. There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost any attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself. We can all begin ‘freely’- as light preference is natural enough; but there are very few of us who have a heart enough to be really in love without encouragement.

21

مخيلة المرأة سريعة, تنقلها من الإعجاب إلى الحب, ومن الحب إلى الزواج في غمضة عين!

21

Hope no one adds zombies to this.

20

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility.

20

And so ended his affection," said Elizabeth impatiently. "There hasbeen many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who firstdiscovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!""I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love," said Darcy.

20

–He luchado en vano. Ya no puedo más. Soy incapaz de contener mis sentimientos. Permítame que le diga que la admiro y la amo apasionadamente.

20

You mean to frighten me, Mr Darcy, by coming in all this state to hear me? But I will not be alarmed though your sister does play so well. There is a stubbornness about me that can never bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises with every attempt to intimidate me.

20

Perhaps,' said Darcy, 'I should have judged better, had I sought an introduction, but I am ill qualified to recommend myself to strangers.''Shall we ask your cousin the reason of this?' said Elizabeth, still addressing Colonel Fitzwilliam. 'Shall we ask him why a man of sense and education, and who has lived in the world, is ill qualified to recommend himself to strangers?''I can answer your question,' said Fitzwilliam, 'without applying to him. It is because he will not give himself the trouble.''I certainly have not the talent which some people possess,' said Darcy, 'of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.''My fingers,' said Elizabeth, 'do not move over this instrument in the masterly manner which I see so many women's do. They have not the same force or rapidity, and do not produce the same expression. But then I have always supposed it to be my own fault -- because I would not take the trouble of practising. It is not that I do not believe my fingers as capable as any other woman's of superior execution.'Darcy smiled, and said, 'You are perfectly right. You have employed your time much better. No one admitted to the privilege of hearing you, can think any thing wanting. We neither of us perform to strangers.

19

The pause was to Elizabeth's feelings dreadful. At length, with a voice of forced calmness, he said: "And this is all the reply which I am to have the honour of expecting! I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus rejected. But it is of small importance.""I might as well inquire," replied she, "why with so evident a desire of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character? Was not this some excuse for incivility, if I was uncivil? But I have other provocations. You know I have. Had not my feelings decided against you— had they been indifferent, or had they even been favourable, do you think that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who has been the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister?

19

And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.""And yours," he replied with a smile, "is willfully to misunderstand them.

19

Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. It is something to think of, and gives her a sort of distinction among her companions

18

I do not wish to avoid the walk. The distance is nothing when one has a motive.

18

That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.

18

Far be it from me, my dear sister, to depreciate such pleasures. They would doubtless be congenial with the generality of female minds. But I confess they would have no charms for me. I should infinitely prefer a book.

18

The loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable - that one false step involves in her endless ruin - that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful - and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the opposite sex.

18

No- I cannot talk of books in a ballroom; my head is always full of something else.

17

If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out."-Elizabeth

17

All the world is good and agreeable in your eyes.

17

You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness.

17

I have not a doubt of your doing very well together. Your tempers are by no means unlike. You are each of you so complying, that nothing will ever be resolved on; so easy, that every servant will cheat you; and so generous, that you will always exceed your income.

17

No poseo el talento de otros que pueden conversar con facilidad con quienes nunca han visto. No tengo valor para ello ni puedo adaptarme al carácter de los demás con la facilidad que otros lo hacen.

16

In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels.

16

Your conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you. My mind was more agreeably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty women can bestow." Mr. Darcy

15

Pride," observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, "is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it it very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or the other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have other think of us.

15

Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with. A woman must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages, to deserve the word; and besides all this, she must possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions, or the word will be but half-deserved.""All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.

15

If he does not come to me, then,' said she, 'I shall give him up for ever.

15

He may live in my memory as the most amiable man of my acquaintance, but that is all. I have nothing either to hope or fear, and nothing to reproach him with.

15

You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.

15

She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man.

14

It was for the sake of what had been, rather than what was.

14

I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever.

14

I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet: I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such attention. I am most seriously displeased.

14

How pleasant it is to spend an evening in this way! I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.

14

It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.

14

Nay," cried Bingley, "this is too much, to remember at night all the foolish things that were said in the morning.

14

Upon the whole, therefore, she found, what has been sometimes found before, that an event to which she had looked forward with impatient desire, did not in taking place, bring all the satisfaction she had promised herself. It was consequently necessary to name some other period for the commencement of actual felicity; to have some other point on which her wishes and hopes might be fixed, and by again enjoying the pleasure of anticipation, console herself for the present, and prepare for another disappointment.

13

No hay distancias cuando se tiene un motivo.

13

What are men compared to rocks and trees?

12

…she felt depressed beyond any thing she had ever known before.

12

If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure.

11
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