The Tempest Quotes

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We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.

744

What's past is prologue.

615

Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.

561

Me, poor man, my libraryWas dukedom large enough.

307

O, wonder!How many goodly creatures are there here!How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,That has such people in't!

228

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.Sometimes a thousand twangling instrumentsWill hum about mine ears; and sometime voices,That, if I then had waked after long sleep,Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming,The clouds methought would open, and show richesReady to drop upon me; that, when I waked,I cried to dream again.

212

Full fathom five thy father lies;Of his bones are coral made;Those are pearls that were his eyes:Nothing of him that doth fade,But doth suffer a sea-changeInto something rich and strange.Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong Hark! now I hear them,—Ding-dong, bell.

160

Now I will believe that there are unicorns...

153

O, brave new worldthat has such people in't!

121

Thought is free.

120

This thing of darkness IAcknowledge mine.

111

Awake, dear heart, awake. Thou hast slept well. Awake.

91

Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

90

Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.

83

Let us not burthen our remembrance withA heaviness that's gone.

79

I would not wish any companion in the world but you.

57

Good wombs have borne bad sons."-- (Miranda, I:2)

55

You taught me language, and my profit on't / Is, I know how to curse

51

I am your wife if you will marry me. If not, I'll die your maid. To be your fellow You may deny me, but I'll be your servant Whether you will or no.

49

At this hourLie at my mercy all mine enemies.

33

I long to hear the story of your life, which must captivate the ear strangely.

33

...and then, in dreaming, / The clouds methought would open and show riches / Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked / I cried to dream again.

30

Watch out he's winding the watch of his wit, by and by it will strike.

30

Ye elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes and groves,And ye that on the sands with printless footDo chase the ebbing Neptune and do fly himWhen he comes back; you demi-puppets thatBy moonshine do the green sour ringlets make,Whereof the ewe not bites, and you whose pastimeIs to make midnight mushrooms, that rejoiceTo hear the solemn curfew; by whose aid,Weak masters though ye be, I have bedimm’dThe noontide sun, call’d forth the mutinous winds,And ‘twixt the green sea and the azured vaultSet roaring war: to the dread rattling thunderHave I given fire and rifted Jove’s stout oakWith his own bolt; the strong-based promontoryHave I made shake and by the spurs pluck’d upThe pine and cedar: graves at my commandHave waked their sleepers, oped, and let ‘em forthBy my so potent art. But this rough magicI here abjure, and, when I have requiredSome heavenly music, which even now I do,To work mine end upon their senses thatThis airy charm is for, I’ll break my staff,Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,And deeper than did ever plummet soundI’ll drown my book.

29

Thou shalt be freeAs mountain winds: but then exactly doAll points of my command.

22

Come unto these yellow sands,And then take hands.Curtsied when you have and kissedThe wild waves whist,Foot is featly here and there;And, sweet sprites, the burden bear.Ariel's song, scene II, Act I

21

Their manners are more gentle, kind, than of our generation you shall find.

20

How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, that has such people in it!

20

This rough magicI here abjure, and, when I have requiredSome heavenly music, which even now I do,To work mine end upon their senses thatThis airy charm is for, I'll break my staff,Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,And deeper than did ever plummet soundI'll drown my book.

19

What, all so soon asleep! I wish mine eyesWould, with themselves, shut up my thoughts...

17

Twas a clever quibble. Here, a garment for it.

16

Now my charms are all o'erthrown,And what strength I have's mine own, -Which is most faint: now, 'tis true,I must be here confined by you...But release me from my bandsWith the help of your good hands:Gentle breath of yours my sailsMust fill, or else my project fails,Which was to please: now I wantSpirits to enforce, art to enchant;And my ending is despair,Unless I be relieved by prayer,Which pierces so, that it assaultsMercy itself, and frees all faults.As you from crimes would pardon'd be,Let your indulgence set me free.

16

I would not wish Any companion in the world but you, Nor can imagination form a shape, Besides yourself, to like of.

16

Noi siamo della stessa materiaDi cui son fatti i sogniE la nostra piccola vitaÈ circondata da un sonno.

15

I'll break my staff, bury it certain fathoms in the earth, and deeper than did ever plummet sound, I'll drown my book!

14

So. Lie there, my art.

13

You cram these words into mine ears against The stomach of my sense.

13

His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract.

13

The fringed curtains of thine eye advance,And say what thou seest yond.

12

I flamed amazement

11

A pox o’ your throat, you bawling, blasphemous, incharitable dog!

10

Somos de la misma sustancia que los sueños, y nuestra breve vida culmina en un dormir.

9

Where the bee sucks, there suck IIn the cow-slip's bell i lieThere I couch when owls do cry

8

There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple. If the ill spirit have so fair a house, Good things will strive to dwell with't

7

Why what a fool was I to this drunken monster for a God. - Caliban

7

For this, be sure, tonight thou shalt have cramps,Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up. UrchinsShall forth at vast of night that they may workAll exercise on thee. Thou shalt be pinchedAs thick as honeycomb, each pinch more stingingThan bees that made 'em.

6

Sycorax has grown into a hoop

6

ARIEL. The charm dissolves apace, And, as the morning steals upon the night, Melting the darkness, so their rising senses Begin to chase the ignorant fumes that mantle Their clearer reason. Their understanding Begins to swell: and the approaching tide Will shortly fill the reasonable shores That now lie foul and muddy.

6

Now I wantSpirits to enforce, art to enchant;And my ending is despair,Unless I be relieved by prayer

6