Jane Austen Quotes - Page 4 | Just Great DataBase

I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.

471

How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.

462

It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.

426

All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one: you need not covet it), is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone!

421

Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.

415

One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.

391

Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.

391

Without music, life would be a blank to me.

390

I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.

376

Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley’s attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty: he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware: to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

375

...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.

370

A man does not recover from such devotion of the heart to such a woman! He ought not; he does not.

367

I am excessively diverted.

366

I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be...yours.

358

I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness. [...] Shyness is only the effect of a sense of inferiority in some way or other. If I could persuade myself that my manners were perfectly easy and graceful, I should not be shy.

357

You must be the best judge of your own happiness.

341

But people themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.

335

I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.

331

They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.

330

Time will explain.

326