Jane Austen Quotes - Page 5 | Just Great DataBase

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.

325

I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

324

She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.

319

She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

301

Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

294

How despicably I have acted!" she cried; "I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust! How humiliating is this discovery! Yet, how just a humiliation! Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our aquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself.

292

Men of sense, whatever you may choose to say, do not want silly wives.

291

Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

290

Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.

290

Now be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?""For the liveliness of your mind, I did.

290

I might as well enquire, replied she, why with so evident a design of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character?

290

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.

290

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.

290

One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.

289

No man is offended by another man's admiration of the woman he loves; it is the woman only who can make it a torment.

285

Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.

281

We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.

279

A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.

276

I have been used to consider poetry as "the food of love" said Darcy."Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what isstrong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, Iam convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.

263

Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

262