Jane Austen Quotes - Page 6 | Just Great DataBase

Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

262

It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are they the result of previous study?

260

Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?

257

One word from you shall silence me forever.

254

If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad.

253

Let us never underestimate the power of a well-written letter.

248

You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner."

247

From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country. I have suspected it some time, but I am now convinced.

246

Now they were as strangers; worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted.

240

Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing; but I have never been in love ; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.

239

A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.

235

Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn--that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness--that season which has drawn from every poet worthy of being read some attempt at description, or some lines of feeling.

233

To wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect

226

She was stronger alone…

224

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.

219

Indeed, I am very sorry to be right in this instance. I would much rather have been merry than wise.

209

To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.

208

She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older: the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.

207

We do not suffer by accident.

206

Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.

201