Study guides - Page 15 | Just Great DataBase

The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

“The Three Musketeers” is a historical novel about four names the whole world knows about: d’Artagnan, Athos, Parthos, and Aramis. Alexandre Dumas was exposed to the great political events in French history, which gave him lots of material to base his text on.  One-of-a-kind France, formidable villains, political intrigues, mystique characters – all this and much...

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

There’s no more popular plot in the science fiction genre than traveling in time. And Herbert George Wells is considered to be the father of time traveling as his works dwell a lot on this topic. “The Time Machine” was published in 1895 and has inspired many films, books, comics, TV series and other works of art that discover the concept of displacing the body forward and...

The Trial by Franz Kafka

The Trial is a surrealistic novel by Franz Kafka that tells us the story of a single average man fighting with the incredibly complicated and incomprehensible bureaucracy. The horror of the story is in the fact that each single element like trial, interrogation or searching for a lawyer makes perfect sense, but altogether they look like a nightmare where anyone understands what is happening...

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

Henry James wrote “The Turn of the Screw” in 1898. James is a well-known author of the world’s classic literature. He is a fine psychologist, very attentive and thorough in his observations of life. He masterfully implements these skills in the process of writing gothic stories. “The Turn of the Screw” is a mystical novel about the ghosts, written in the style of...

The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare

Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare is considered one of the best comedies of the Bard, but from the modern point of view this comedy has rather dark undertones. Despite some classical plot turns used in it like cross-dressing and double wedding in the end, Two Gentlemen of Verona takes the theme of love, friendship and betrayal much more serious than most of the comedies by...

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

The Unbearable Lightness of Being is a novel that describes the family life of Czech couple, Tomas and Tereza, where Tomas is obsessed with his work and is an incurable womanizer, who considers flirt, sex and affairs a necessary part of his life, completely disconnected from love. Other characters are his lover and friend Sabina and her own second lover Franz, who loves her sincerely. The author...

The Way of the World by William Congreve

The Way of The World by William Congreve is a play that is mostly dedicated to displaying a single vice: lust and infidelity. The play starts from a classical plot: the two young people in love want to marry, but to do so Mirabell must get permission of Millamant’s aunt. Everything seems very clear, especially when we see the character of Lady Wishfort, the aforementioned aunt, seemingly...

The Wild Duck by Henrik Ibsen

The Wild Duck is a play by Henrik Ibsen that is considered the first modern example of tragicomedy. It, as his another play, The Enemy of the People, tells us the story about an idealist, who believes that absolute truth is an absolute good. He comes to the family of his former classmate to reveal the truth to everyone and take all the skeletons out of the closets. He is sincerely surprised...

The Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare

The Winter’s Tale by William Shakespeare is one of his several “problem plays”. It starts as a classical tragedy, but ends in a comedic and light-hearted way, despite even this can undo the death of the innocent at the beginning. The main plot turns were borrowed from Robert Greene’s pastoral novel Pandosto. The names of characters and places are changed, but the...

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman is a well-known women right advocate and tough journalist. No issue or social wrongdoing would escape her unwavering pen. While marriage is a game of two, it isn’t always an equal game. The downsides of women being sentenced to staying at home were the center of most of her works.  “The Yellow Wallpaper” is one of her most vivid and provoking books...

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

“Their Eyes Were Watching God” is a marvelous example of women literature that can do better upon the reader than most of the self-help books. Zora Neale Hurston made a name for herself as a writer and secured a place in the best American books ranks thanks to this novel. Composed by an African-American author, it conveys the reality of an American society of the early 20th century...

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

In 1958 Chinua Ahebe wrote “ Things Fall Apart” and it was one of the few African novels written in English language originally. During his childhood, Chinua was exposed to both Christian and native African values and culture, which allowed the author to relay the story of this nation in a manner that is particularly interesting and easy to understand for the western world.  The...

Through The Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll wrote a continuation for his “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” six years after the original book was published. “Through the Looking-Glass” picks up the story of a curious and fearless young girl six months after the previous book has left it. And this time the adventures are even more crazy and fascinating than before! This time Alice steps through...

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

There are just few books that are absolutely obligatory to read at any high school throughout the US and one of them is “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. The book is a multifaceted story of three kids who manage to lead a fun teenager life together while discovering very grown up concepts. Morality, rape, racial injustice, friendship, unfairness, fear, differences. Life is fickle...

To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

“To the Lighthouse” is the fifth novel of the legendary author Virginia Woolf. The text offers a pleasurable journey to the magnificent Scottish land site called the Isle of Skye. Great focus on the philosophy and analysis in this book makes it a wonderful text where every reader will find something for himself. “To the Lighthouse” is a complex book, which doesn't...

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote “Treasure Island” in 1881. Once named a “boy’s book”, it received wide appraisal among general public as a great adventure novel. If you love pirates, gold hunt quests, secret maps, abundance of alcohol or crazy parties, tropical nature and exotic animals, then you will surely fall in love with the story. Prepare to set on a colorful sea...

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

“Tuesdays with Morrie” belongs to the authorship of Mitch Albom. The book talks about the experience of author’s teacher Morrie Schwartz who was dying from ALS. The memoir found its place among many bestseller lists and was made into a movie in 1999. Morrie Schwartz was Albom’s favorite professor at the university. Despite the great connection between them, Mitch kept on...

Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare

“The Twelfth Night” was written by William Shakespeare and is one of the few comical plays of his authorship. It is light and musical, beautiful and ambitious, funny and very worldly. The play is one of the most popular both for reading and staging.   Sometimes it seems that all comedy shows use “The Twelfth Night” as something to strive towards. It has a rich...

Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup

Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup is a memoir he tried to write as precisely as possible. This book contains no morals like in “Uncle Toms Cabin” and no epiphany. The goal of Northup was to describe the institute of slavery in all its ugliness. Born a free black person and being a skilled carpenter and musician, Solomon was once offered a short-term job in the travelling circus...

Ulysses by James Joyce

“Ulysses” is a legendary masterpiece of the Irish father of contemporary drama James Joyce. Published as a complete piece in 1922, today the book is considered to be the greatest work of modern literary genres. The author wrote a text that has not two layers, but dozens and hundreds of them.  “Ulysses”, which was given the name that derives from the ancient Odysseus...

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